FAQs

Ans. School Mapping exercise {Manually (Through Formats) or Geo Informatics System (GIS) based mapping} along with distance matrix exercise is the method which we can apply to decide appropriate location for opening of new secondary schools.

Ans. School mapping (SM) is a normative approach to the micro‐planning of school locations. It is an essential planning tool to overcome possibilities of regional inequalities in the provision of educational facilities.
The term school mapping seemingly implies that the exercise is confined to location of schools. This is not true. School mapping is an exercise useful to rationally allocate educational facilities of any type related to any level of education.
There are two major characteristics of the School mapping exercise.
1. School Mapping incorporates spatial and demographic dimensions into the educational planning process.
2. Location of educational facilities depends on the norms and standards prescribed by the authorities.

Ans. The major objectives of school mapping exercise are:

  • To address existing disparities in the distribution of educational facilities.
  • To create equality of educational opportunities.
  • To identify most appropriate location (Habitation or Village) for opening of new Secondary School or alternatives.
  • To identify the location for opening of alternatives to formal school.

Ans. Para 5.3.1 of RMSA framework state “Undertaking detailed mapping of Secondary Schooling Provisions, course mapping and streamlining the Secondary Education database is of paramount importance for universalization of access” . Further Para 3.13.2 of framework state that evidences of School mapping and micro planning habitation wise/village wise/cluster wise/urban area wise/slum wise/ward wise should be available

in the District Plan. So we can say that Habitation wise school mapping exercise is necessary before preparing proposal for secondary school.

Answer: -
Following are the suggestive steps to complete school mapping exercise:
Step 1
• Deciding the administrative unit (District, Block and schools level) for carrying out the school mapping exercise
• Each and every habitation may be listed for mapping exercise. (Website-www.indiawater.IMIS)
• Habitation wise population with availability of schooling facility with distance data may be collected through GIS or Mapping
Step 2
• Listing of all habitations/ villages to identify served area through GIS or Mapping
• The available High schools and details of schools from SEMIS
• High schools and their catchment area
Step 3
• Listing of all habitations/ villages to identify un-served areas through GIS or Manual Mapping.
• Details of Upper primary schools located in the catchment area from DISE.
• Distance Matrix exercise should be done.
• A list of UPS may be prepared which are eligible for upgrading into secondary level as per the State’s norm.
Step 4
• Actual physical verification should be done by a team Block and District level officers for confirming details of existing Secondary Schools.
• Actual physical verification should be done by a team block and district level officers for confirming details of Upper Primary Schools eligible for upgrading into secondary level.
Step 5
• Based on the final verification, prioritization may be done.
• Propose year wise existing gap in the existing secondary schools
• Propose year wise new secondary schools selected for opening
• Propose year wise other strateis like residential schools/ Hostels facility/ Transportation facility etc. to fill the gaps for providing universal access, universal enrolment and universal retention.

Ans. At the time of school mapping exercise, distances imply walking/ cycling distance by road. These distances between habitation to habitation or school to habitation are measured through a manual survey. If we collect distance data from Geo Informatics
System (GIS) based survey, we get aerial distances. Data of aerial distances should be physically verified. It is important to take into consideration the possible walking distance without barriers for children. Therefore if there are any barriers like a river without a bridge or a hilly terrain, which cannot be crossed by children, the distance should not be seen as aerial distance. It should be measured through the route, which the children can travel without difficulty.

Ans. Mandal/Block should be the unit for school mapping exercise.

Ans. In the school mapping exercise, it may be better to measure catchment area of a school taking into account distance between habitations than distances within habitations. Distances within habitations are of less concern even when it is longer, but distance between habitations are of more concern even when it is shorter. The nearby habitations may share educational facilities. Therefore distances between habitations are more important than distances within habitations to locate any educational facility.
It is also important to take into consideration the possible walking distance for children without barriers. Therefore if there are any barriers like a river without a bridge or a hilly terrain, which cannot be crossed by children, then distances should not be seen as aerial distance. It should be measured through the route, which the children can travel without difficulty.

Ans. We would calculate actual enrolment of class VIII students of Upper Primary Schools which are located within the catchment area of Upper Primary school proposed for upgrading into Secondary level. Total actual enrolment of class VIII enrolment would be expected enrolment for class IX.

Ans. Following are the access related objectives set under RMSA :-
• To make good quality secondary education available, accessible and affordable to all young persons in the age group of 14-18 years.
• To provide secondary school within a reasonable distance of any habitation, which should be 5 kms. for secondary schools and 7-10 kms. for higher secondary schools.
• Ensure universal access of secondary education by 2017 (GER of 100%),and
• Universal retention by 2020.
• To ensure that no child is deprived of secondary education of satisfactory quality due to gender, socio-economic, disability and other barriers.

• To ensure that all secondary schools have physical facilities, staff and supplies up to the prescribed standards

Ans. Interpreting the relevant provisions of RMSA framework, enrolment and distance norms are evolved in various PAB meetings and being followed at the national level for approving Upgradation/ new Secondary Schools under Rashtriya Madhyamik Shiksha Abhiyan (RMSA).
Following are the Norms for upgrading upper Primary schools into secondary school (To warrant 2 section school) at the national level.
• Distance norm- Non-availability of High school facility within a distance of 5 km.
• Enrolment Norm-
1) At least 70 children should be enrolled in class 8 of feeder UPSs within catchment area.
2) Availability of at least 25 children (Which may be relaxed in certain conditions) in class 8th of the Upper Primary Schools proposed for up gradation.

Ans. Interpreting the relevant provisions of RMSA framework, (As per Para 2.1.1 and Para 4.2 of RMSA framework) following relaxed norms are evolved in various PAB meetings and being followed at the national level for approving Upgradation/ new secondary schools under Rashtriya Madhyamik Shiksha Abhiyan (RMSA).
Relaxations on National norm on case to case basis
Case 1 In case of special situation like SC, ST, Minority, LWE Affected Districts and MDM Educational backward blocks to short out economic and social barrier
• Non-availability of High school facility within the distance of 5 km.
• At least 50 children should be enrolled in class 8 of feeder UPSs within catchment area to warrant 2 section schools.
Case 2. In case of special situation like Hilly/ Difficult Terrain/ River (Natural/ physical Barriers)
• Non-availability of High school facility within the distance of 3 km.
• At least 50 and 25 children should be enrolled in class 8 of feeder UPSs within catchment area to warrant 2 sections and 1 section school respectively.
Case 3. In case of special situation like difficult terrain and low density of population in the State (North East Region / HP / J&K / Uttarakhand), and international border areas to address school specific/ habitation specific barriers.
• Non-availability of High school facility within the distance of 5 km or as per State specific norm
• At least 50 and 25 children should be enrolled in class 8 of feeder UPSs within catchment area to warrant 2 section and 1 section school respectively.

Ans. As per the scheme norms, estimated cost for construction of two section school is Rs. 58.12 lakh and for construction of one section school, cost norm is Rs. 46.86 lakh.

Ans. Yes, Enrolment norm can be relaxed in certain circumstances (Refer to Q. No. 13) and one section school may be provided in this condition. If the school/ habitation is having specific barriers, than it is possible to upgrade that particular school.

Ans. River is in between the village and the nearest high school, which may be considered as natural barrier. In case of natural barrier like Hilly/ Difficult Terrain/ River, we may consider relaxation of following enrolment and distance norm and approve one or two section school.
• Non-availability of High school facility within the distance of 3 km.
• At least 50 and 25 children should be enrolled in class 8 of feeder UPSs within catchment area to warrant 2 sections and 1 section school respectively.
Considering above norms, In this case Upper Primary school would be eligible for upgrading into one section secondary school.

Ans. RMSA framework provisioned for establishing of Hostels/ residential schools in para 2.1.3, para 6.2.2, para 6.2.5, para 6.2.8, para 6.2.9. There is no described financial norm to sanction residential facility in the premises of existing secondary schools under RMSA framework. Therefore PAB has not decided to provide residential facility to the existing schools till now.

Ans. RMSA framework provisioned in para 2.1.3, in respect of establishment of Hostel / residential schools, but there is no described financial (recurring and non-recurring) norm to sanction residential schools under RMSA framework therefore PAB has taken unanimous decision not to approve residential facility to the existing schools.
Further, RMSA framework revision is under process and only after than proposal may be considered for establishing of residential schools and upgrading of KGBVs.
If the proposal is considered for upgrading Ashram School, KGBVs or other Upper Primary Schools attached with the hostel facility following norms may be applied with the approval of PAB.
• Distance norm may be relaxed as per RMSA norm or State specific norm.
• At least 50 and 25 children should be enrolled in class 8 to warrant two-section and one-section school respectively.
• Hostel facility should be available.

Ans. Yes, Under RMSA, there is a provision to provide new school to the girls to continue their education in the same standard and management of education without any interruption. Considering this fact, KGB Vidhyalayas along with residential facility/ hostels are eligible for upgradation into secondary level.

Ans. It is mentioned that KGBVs scheme is a centralized scheme for providing residential schools at upper primary level for girls belonging predominantly to the SC, ST, OBC and minorities in difficult areas.
KGBVs scheme has I, II, and III model. Model I KGBVs are schools with hostels for 100 girls, Model II KGBVs are schools with hostels for 50 girls, Model school III KGBVs are hostels in existing schools for 50 girls.
In view of providing school, All KGBV Model may be eligible for upgrading into secondary level on the basis of relaxed enrolment norm i.e. At least 50 and 25 children should be enrolled in class 8 to warrant 2 section and 1 section school respectively.

Ans. It is mentioned that KGBVs scheme is a centralized scheme for providing residential schools at upper primary level for girls belonging predominantly to the SC, ST, OBC and minorities in difficult areas.
KGBVs scheme has I, II, and III model. Model I KGBVs are schools with hostels for 100 girls, Model II KGBVs are schools with hostels for 50 girls, Model school III KGBVs are hostels in existing schools for 50 girls.
In view of providing school, All KGBV Model may be eligible for upgrading into secondary level on the basis of relaxed enrolment norm i.e. At least 50 and 25 children should be enrolled in class 8 to warrant 2 section and 1 section school respectively.

Ans. It is mentioned that KGBVs scheme is a centralized scheme for providing residential schools at upper primary level for girls belonging predominantly to the SC, ST, OBC and minorities in difficult areas.
KGBVs scheme has I, II, and III model. Model I KGBVs are schools with hostels for 100 girls, Model II KGBVs are schools with hostels for 50 girls, Model school III KGBVs are hostels in existing schools for 50 girls.
In view of providing school, All KGBV Model may be eligible for upgrading into secondary level on the basis of relaxed enrolment norm i.e. At least 50 and 25 children should be enrolled in class 8 to warrant 2 section and 1 section school respectively.

Ans. It is mentioned that KGBVs scheme is a centralized scheme for providing residential schools at upper primary level for girls belonging predominantly to the SC, ST, OBC and minorities in difficult areas.
KGBVs scheme has I, II, and III model. Model I KGBVs are schools with hostels for 100 girls, Model II KGBVs are schools with hostels for 50 girls, Model school III KGBVs are hostels in existing schools for 50 girls.
In view of providing school, All KGBV Model may be eligible for upgrading into secondary level on the basis of relaxed enrolment norm i.e. At least 50 and 25 children should be enrolled in class 8 to warrant 2 section and 1 section school respectively.

Ans. If the proposal considered for upgrading KGBVs or other Upper Primary Schools attached with the hostel facility following norms may be applied with the approval of PAB.
• Distance norm may be relaxed as per RMSA norm or State specific norm
• At least 50 and 25 children should be enrolled in class 8 to warrant 2 section and 1 section school respectively.
• Hostel facility should be available.
It is also mentioned that all proposed KGBVs are situated in EBB and therefore state government may take benefit of the other centrally sponsored scheme i.e. Girls’ Hostel scheme and may provide hostel facility in the same premises of the proposed location of the secondary school.

Ans. Following are the essential information required in the proposal for opening of new secondary school.
1. Name of the Upper Primary Schools With full address:
2. School DISE Code :
3. Special geo-physical and other features of the habitation
4. Village Panchayat / Town panchayat / Municipality /Corpopration / Township / ……………………………(other/ specify)
5. Cluster Name (CRC) :
6. Block Name :
7. Educational profile of block:-
8. Educational District:
9. Date of upgradation as Middle School
10. Enrollment Particulars :( From latest DISE Data)
11. Details of nearby Upper Primary/ Middle Schools within a distance of 5 K.M from this school (All kinds of management including private self-finance)
12. Details of nearby Govt. and Govt. Aided High /Higher Secondary Schools within a distance of 10 K.M from this School.
13. Land details of the Middle School (In acres)
14. Details of land acquired for the purpose of upgrading the school into High School
15. Details of Community Contribution
16. Signature and name of the Authorized Signatory with seal (AEEO/AAEEO/DEO/ Chief Educational Officer/ Dist. Prog. Coordinator)

The infrastructural support to the Secondary Schools already in existence in the state / UT is termed as Strengthening of Secondary School.

Yes, a ceiling of Rs. 36.85 Lakhs is there for the strengthening of schools.

It includes Additional Class Rooms, Computer Lab, Science Lab & Lab equipment, Art/Craft/Culture Room, Library Room, Toilet Block & Drinking Water.

The New Secondary Sections/School opened either by up-gradation of already existing elementary School or opening of a stand-alone Secondary School in the state / UT is termed as New Secondary School.

Yes, a ceiling of Rs. 58.12 Lakhs is there for two section & 46.86 Lakhs is there for one section secondary schools.

One Section School means one section each in class IX & X and two Section School means two sections each in class IX & X along with the other components.

It includes Class Rooms (2nos. for one section schools & 4nos. in case of two section schools), 01 no. Computer Lab, 01 no. Science Lab along with Lab equipment, 01 no. Art/Craft/Culture Room, 01 no. Library Room, 01 no. Toilet Block & Drinking Water.

Rs.5.625 Lakhs which includes 01 lakh of furniture component viz. 4.625 lakh is available for the construction of class room where as 01 lakh is meant for the furniture for the Class room.

Rs.5.0 Lakhs which includes 0.40 lakh of furniture component viz. 4.6 lakh is available for the construction of Computer Lab where as 0.40 lakh is meant for the furniture for the Computer Lab .

Rs.5.0 Lakhs which includes 0.40 lakh of furniture component viz. 4.6 lakh is available for the construction of Office room where as 0.40 lakh is meant for the furniture for the Office room.

Rs.5.0 Lakhs which includes 0.40 lakh of furniture component viz. 4.6 lakh is available for the construction of HM room where as 0.40 lakh is meant for the furniture for the HM room.

Rs.6.10 Lakhs which includes 01.50 lakh of furniture component viz. 4.60 lakh is available for the construction of Science Lab whereas 01.50
lakh is meant for the furniture for the Lab.

Rs. 01 Lakhs which includes Lab equipment for an integrated Science Lab.

Rs.5.0 Lakhs which includes 0.40 lakh of furniture component viz. 4.6 lakh is available for the construction of room where as 0.40 lakh is meant for the furniture for the room.

Rs.7.0 Lakhs which includes 0.25 lakh of furniture component viz. 6.75 lakh is available for the construction of Library room where as 0.25 lakh is meant for the furniture for the Library room.

A block of toilet which consists of 02 Lavatory & 02 Urinals for Boys and 02 Lavatory & 02 Urinals for Girls.

Yes, The unit cost is meant for 66 square meters of plinth area (clear size of room is 49 square meters) in case of Class room, Science Lab, Art/Craft/Culture room, Office room, HM room, Computer Lab and incase of Library it is for 100 square meters of plinth area (clear size of room is 74.2 (i.e. 7 X 10.60 ) square meters)

Those schoolswho is having its own building.The School building should not be newly built or under Construction.

No, as of now it is fixed and the size of the schools is not having the bearing on it.

As per the need and is subjected to the Maximum of 2 Lakh for 2 Section school& 4 Lakh for 4 Section schools. That too after the actual assessment of the need of the particular school and as per the technically sanctioned & administratively approved estimate for the same supported with the photographs of the affected area to be covered. Can be taken-up under the special circumstances.

>The Class rooms taken up for major repair must be more than 10 yrs. Old. >The subsequent major repair should only be proposed after 05 completed yrs. Of last repair. >The estimated cost of repair should exceed the limit of minor repair viz. Rs. 25000/-
>That too only when the building is of its own not the rented or on lease or any form of non-permanent lending. >The in-completed building of other schemes or department should not be covered. >Structurally failed building should not form the part of it.
>This should be allocated strictly on the basis of technically sanctioned as well asadministratively approved estimates by the competent authority of the state / UT Govt.

The repair work of school building which includes Class rooms, Laboratory, Library, Office, HM Room, Computer room,Art/craft/ culture Room etc. may be taken up.

The physical infrastructural gap of the school proposed under the head of strengthening should be duly assessed and proposed at one go viz. piece-meal approach based proposal should not be followed.

No, this activity is available for those schools
• Which are located in in-accessible rural/hilly/areas with difficult terrain
• The location of which is not served or well served by the transport facility.
• Where there is no accommodation facility available on rent in the catchment area of the school.

Yes, in-case the school is very remotely located and the construction in cluster form doesn’t serve the purpose for which it is. Preference to be given to construct the quarter in cluster form if there is more than one school falling in that kind of location and while selecting the site the security aspect should also be kept in view.

Ans. Procurement refers to purchasing or hiring services or obtaining goods through E-platform. Under e-procurement goods or services are purchased/hired via web portal. The tenders are floated on website showing requirement of services of the specified quality, tentative price is also shown and bids are invited online and opened at a specific date & time. On the basis of bids received the evaluation of L-1 (lowest) is done. On the basis of lowest evaluated bidder the order is placed. In this manner the goods or services can be hired at most competitive prices, in a fair, just and transparent manner. In this way e-procurement is transparent, convenient with least time and cost overruns. On the other hand Procurement of goods, services or goods without using E-platform or e-publishing is manual procurement.

Digital Signature Certificates (DSC) are the digital equivalent (that iselectronic format) of physical or paper certificates. Examples ofphysical certificates are drivers' licenses, passports or membershipcards. Certificates serve as a proof of identity of an individual for acertain purpose; for example, a driver's license identifies someone whocan legally drive in a particular country. Likewise, a digital certificatecan be presented electronically to prove the identity of individual, to access information or services on the internet or to sign certain documents digitally.

For the purpose of viewing or downloading tender documents Digital Signature Certificate is not required. Only for uploading or floating of tenders DSC is required. For obtaining DSC, the HOD of Dept. can apply in the name of Nodal Officer by filling an application form along with necessary documents like PAN card, Photo ID proof, & residence proof. Under one Nodal Officer two or three sub-users can also be created in the name of Tender Creator & Tender publisher thereby authorizing them. Thus DSC is a medium to access information or services on the Internet or to sign certain documents digitally.

For bringing transparency in functioning of Govt. Dept. it is necessary that sluggishness in Govt. decision making should be addressed through e-governance & e-procurement should be made compulsory at the earliest. Keeping in view this aspect in mind, it is emphasized that all procurements of civil, goods& servicesof and above the value of
Rs50.00 Lakh should be procured through e-platform under RMSA with effect from 01 April 2012.

The usage of E-platform is as easy as using internet & Windows. One who is familiar with computers can understand it well. Even NIC conducts training to familiarize new users both for principal & bidder. Any person interested to know its use can attend it. Even at initial stage of uploading of tenders help can be sought from NIC officials. Once a person is confident & aware about simple steps of floating of tender he can easily use it for procurements of higher value. At initial stage tenders of small value can be floated like purchase of stationary, hiring of vehicles, and appointment of statutory/concurrent auditors. At later stage tenders of higher value which involve large amount like civil works can be floated.

E-procurement is paper less, electronic system of uploading/downloading of documents whereas manual tendering requires dealing with paper & also cumbersome.
Under e-procurement the tenders are published on web site, documents can be downloaded & can be accessed anytime anywhere whereas in manual tendering it has to be advertised in newspaper & documents required to be collected manually.
E-procurement requires less time, easy & convenient whereas manual tendering is cumbersome and requires lots of time in evaluation of L-1 (lowest evaluated bidder.)
E-procurement is latest technology effectively being adopted gradually by all states whereas manual tendering is primitive way of advertising tenders.
E-procurement is transparent, competitive & fair method way of procuring goods, services or works whereas manual tendering is time consuming, cumbersome, requires handling of large volume of papers.

The Tender Document will state how long the bids should remain valid.This implies that the Tender Inviting Authority will complete the bidopening, tender evaluation and contract award during this period.

Nodal officer is the key official who drives the implementation of theproject in their Ministry / Department / Organization. He also creates users for his organization.

Role is the activity assigned to a person to be performed in his officialcapacity. The assigned role can be for Tender Creator, Tender Publisher,Tender Opener, Tender Evaluator, Auditor, etc. At ePublishing stage,only Tender Creator and Tender Publisher roles are required.

Tender Publisher is an officer who will verify the correctness of the tender being published and has been assigned the role for Tender Publishing. Whereas Tender Publisher is an officer who verifies the correctness of tender before publishing and has been authorized for publishing it.

At least in one national English daily.

E-publishing refers to hosting of tender on website for the purpose of advertising & inviting bidders to submit bids manually whereas E-procurement is a complete process comprising of not only advertising but also inviting bids online & submission. The evaluation of bids is also done by the system itself and the lowest bidder is evaluated.

Annual Grant may be used for supplementing facilities in the school. This has been provided at Rs.50000 per school.
The following activities may be undertaken:
• Repair/ replacement of laboratory equipment, purchase of lab consumables, purchase of books periodicals , news paper, electricity charge, water charges
• Sports, music, dance, painting, culture, teaching aids
• Equipments for teaching geography as elective
• Drawing equipments & painting materials
• Maps, charts, specified instruments & appliances
• Sports equipments, uniforms etc.
• To meet petty and contingent expenditure like Organizing meetings, Conveyance, stationeries
• The above mentioned activities are illustrative in nature. Other activities may be specifically planned taking into account the school specific reality e.g. providing Teaching Aid to Teachers. But one thing needs to be taken into account while planning for specificities under School Annual Grant that this fund cannot be diverted to other schools if the fund is unutilized in a school.

Incentives are currently not being supported under RMSA

Under very special circumstances this has been allowed. The case of Mewat in Haryana may be mentioned here. An amount of Rs.2.5 lakh was approved in the PAB of 2010-11 to provide transport facility in girls in Mewat District by providing 5
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transportation routes @Rs.10000 per route. This programme had been proposed for girl students since the girls were unable to reach schools as the area was unsafe.

The Teacher Recruitment Policy is left to the states and the norms followed by the states would be the norms accepted by the MHRD.

PTR is not a viable option for calculating teachers at the secondary level. That is why under RMSA, both the subject specific requirement of the state as well as the PTR is kept in mind for calculation of teachers. The approved RMSA norm is to provide a minimum of 5 subject teachers for a secondary school with upto two sections in each class. Since the RMSA scheme envisages a Student Classroom Ratio (SCR) of 40:1, a two section school would normally mean an enrolment of 160 students. A minimum of 5 subject teachers will have to be provided even if the enrolment is less than 160. Any short fall in such schools will be made good under RMSA. For every incremental enrolment of 30 students, 1 additional teacher may be provided as per the RMSA norm of PTR of 30:1. The number of sanctioned posts will be deducted from the total number of teachers so estimated to arrive at the number of additional teachers a State will get under RMSA for existing secondary schools. The subject-wise distribution of teachers has been left to the State Government.

Currently there is a specific norm that is applied to arrive at the additional teachers to be provided under RMSA which is based on both the subject teacher requirement and Pupil-Teacher Ratio. If there are enough teachers in the schools to teach the subject that is supposed to be taught, the workload should automatically get divided equally between all teachers.

Under the norms of RMSA for providing teachers, no separate for bio-science has been provided for. It is therefore suggested that a teacher for biological science may be recruited against the post of science teacher. There is already a separate mathematics teacher, who can teach physical science at secondary level. The bio-science teacher in most cases will also be qualified to teach chemistry at secondary level.

Special Teachers like teachers teaching Art and craft and physical education under the norms of RMSA have got little attention. But for the time being these posts will have to be the responsibility of the State Governments. It is likely that a dedicated art and craft teacher will be under employed in a standalone two-section secondary school. On the other hand, in a composite school, art & craft and physical education teacher may be available in the elementary section, whose services could also be utilised for secondary classes. States could also explore the possibility of convergence with the elementary sections.

There is a provision of providing a Computer Teacher under the scheme ict @ school. Computer Teacher may be taken under that scheme.

The norm of (5+1) teachers has been approved by the National Mission in its meeting held on 25.04.2011. NCERT has recommended a norm of (6+1) teachers for a new secondary school with two sections in each class keeping in view the 3 language formula. The subject teachers recommended by the NCERT are:
(i) 1 teacher for first language
(ii) 1 teacher for second language
(iii) 1 teacher for third language
(iv) 1 teacher for mathematics
(v) 1 teacher for science
(vi) 1 teacher for social science
 If two language teachers are allowed (excluding the teacher for third language), the number of subject teacher also comes down to 5. There is therefore no contradiction between the (5+1) norm and the NCERT recommendations.

Once the enrolment becomes steady in the schools and the enrolment goes above 160 in a two-section section, the schools become entitled for additional teachers. In a one-section school, it would be expected that they would take the norm of > 160 as their norm before proposing additional teachers. Otherwise in a one-section school, if additional teachers were considered at an enrolment of 80, then teachers would be under-utilized.

Under RMSA, it was felt that rather than linking additional teachers in an existing school with the number of classrooms and Classroom Teacher Ratio (CTR), the norm may be based on enrolment. The approved RMSA norm is to provide a minimum of 5 subject teachers for a secondary school with upto two sections in each class. Since the RMSA scheme envisages a Student Classroom Ratio (SCR) of 40:1, a two section school would normally mean an enrolment of 160 students. A minimum of 5 subject teachers will have to be provided even if the enrolment is less than 160. Any short fall in such schools will be made good under RMSA. For every incremental enrolment of 30 students, 1 additional teacher may be provided as per the RMSA norm of PTR of 30:1. The total number of teachers for a school may be arrived at following the above method, which will be aggregated for all schools to estimate the total number of teachers a State is eligible as per RMSA norm. The number of sanctioned posts will be deducted from the total number of teachers so estimated to arrive at the number of additional teachers a State will get under RMSA for existing secondary schools.

Subject-wise distribution of teachers has been left to the State Government. However, as per the advice of the Planning Commission, the Ministry has decided to emphasize on appointment of additional science and math teachers in order to achieve the primary objective of universal access to quality secondary education. The State Government may be advised to fill up the short fall for math and science teachers on priority out of the posts sanctioned under RMSA.

A training need analysis is a fundamental part of the training programme. But there may not be a requirement of formal assessment. Rather at the end of the previous year’s training programme a feedback be taken as to what should be the focus of next year’s training. Also when the school development plan is being formed then that school’s teachers asked as to what training they would prefer in the current year. That should very clearly be reflected in the current year’s plan. That would also corroborate the feedback received by the state in last year’s training.

• Teacher Training is a process and each of the activity cited below are important to ensure that the development of the teacher is continuous. The various activities that are supported under RMSA are as below:
• Module Development: The module is a plan or a white paper for training to document the training strategy so that they become replicable. The Development of the module should be done through deliberations and workshops in the state. Teacher Training Institutes, teacher educators as well as teachers need to be part of the module preparation. Modules need to be prepared keeping in mind field realities. Moreover modules should
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be developed such that training becomes more participatory. Specific need based plan to be provided by the state for the development of modules. The financial norms would be as per the need of the state.
• Training of Key Resource Persons and Master Trainers: The training of Key Resource Persons and Master Trainers would be the next phase in the cascade mode of training should the states choose to adopt this strategy. Key Resource Persons and Master Trainers to be identified keeping in mind the realities of training preferably from institutes and universities. The number of KRP and Master Trainers would depend on the number of Master Trainers and teachers to be trained respectively. The financial norm would be an amount of Rs.300 per person per day for 5days.
• In-service Training: The In-service training is aimed at continuing the education of the teacher to keep them in tune with changes in theory and practice of education. The aim is also to upgrade the qualifications of teachers who are under qualified or unqualified and motivating the teachers to take on more educational innovation. It also counterbalances the increasing phenomena of burn-out in teachers. The financial norm for the same is Rs.300 per day for 5 days. It is also expected that states would explore convergence with other schemes to increase the number of days assigned for training.
• Short Term Professional Development: Under Short term professional Development programme, RMSA supports Professional Development Tours. These tours provide an opportunity to expand learning and to reflect on teaching, consider pedagogy, and expand horizons. It helps the teachers learn about the diversity of their own state by exploring the best practices and innovative teaching methods in the state. The tours should be planned in such a way that they are linked to the curriculum and provides exposure to a variety of teaching practices. Professional Development Tours would provide experiential learning for teachers. The financial norms are Rs. 200 per teacher for travel within the state and Rs.20000 per teacher for travel outside the state.
• Site based Professional Development: The aim of Site based professional Development is to enable teachers translate training into reality in the classroom. In such an environment, teachers can successfully collaborate with one another on lessons and units. The importance of continued support needs to be linked to in-school activities after the initial training of teachers. The various activities that may be explored within this support may be the following. These include observation and feedback to inform teachers' development, coaching in new strategies, shared planning, co-teaching, and discussion with teachers to identify areas for development. Onsite support directly prepares teachers to present the lessons, and, in the process, helps to foster teacher confidence, enthusiasm, and commitment to program goals. On-site training and support sets the stage for successful program implementation.
A group of teachers should be deputed at the level of the district to form a group of specialists who will support classroom transactions. This group of specialists should be provided training to help the schools that they visit. This is a system that has been in practice in Kerala and Madhya Pradesh. The various activities under Site-based professional support programme may be the following:
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a) Instruction by specialists: Specialists may use initial sessions to introduce teachers in the strategies, usually through a combination of instruction and discussion.
b) Regular support: Initial instruction should be followed up with regular classroom visits where the researchers observe and discuss teachers' implementation of the teaching strategies.
c) Observation and feedback: Observation and feedback is a main feature of specialist support. Observation by the specialist group to explore the way teachers are implementing new strategies, then providing helpful feedback for the teacher is an important strategy of the support provided.
d) Coaching in new techniques and strategies: The specialist group who is continuously trained in updated techniques of teaching-learning can share and update the teaching techniques for the teachers of the schools where they visit.
The financial norms are as per the state plan proposed.
• Distance Learning Programme: This has been specifically aimed at through the Education satellite or EDUSAT as it is commonly known as. The aim is to connect every school through a Satellite Interactive Terminal or a Receive Only Terminal. School Specific Planning would have to be done in order to implement this mode of learning. This would facilitate Learning of teachers at one’s own pace and according to one’s own time. Convergence may be explored for programme to be aired. The budget is as per state plan. But detailed estimate has to be provided by the state to justify the cost portrayed.
• Induction Training of Newly Recruited Teacher: Induction Training is meant for teachers who have completed their pre-service courses and are ready to join service as a teacher. The aim of induction training is to change student of teaching into teachers of students. Teacher induction can refer to a variety of different activities such as classes, workshops, orientations, seminars, and especially, mentoring. The latter refers to the personal guidance provided, usually by seasoned veterans, to beginning teachers in schools. A profile of teachers may be drawn up after the recruitment process is over and it may be planned what kind of induction training would be provided to the new Recruitees. Involvement of Directorates of School Education/ SCERT/SIE/Teacher Training Institutes in the training must be explored. The Split Model of Training may be used so that realities and problems that the teachers face during teaching may be part of the training programme. The financial norm for the same would be Rs.300 per day for 10 days.
• Each of the above activities would be funded separately. But they are part of a comprehensive training package that should be planned by the states keeping in mind the state specific needs of that particular year. The total number of teachers for training would not change in a particular state. If the state wants to explore innovative methods, they would have to plan accordingly. For example, a state may not propose in-service training for all teachers and content enrichment training for science separately. In that particular year then under in-service training, science teachers would have to go for content enrichment training. The states may propose different kinds of training but within the larger ambit of teacher training programme.

Yes, but they will have to be integrated in the programme. There should not be several parallel activities at the same time. That would actually dilute the effect of the programme and the impact of the programme would not be effective. Moreover burnout of the teachers may be too much after attending several training programmes

There are short term professional courses supported by the RMSA programme. Commonly called ‘Study Tours’, these programmes have to be planned in such a way that they become extended programmes of professional development for teachers. This should be planned specifically with a focus on how the tour would have an impact on quality.

Online support may be provided to teachers. It can be provided without financial input through open software. This has been piloted in Karnataka and is called the Subject Teacher Forum. The Subject Teacher Forum is a community of peer practitioners for continuous learning and professional development. Since the geographical distance may prevent teachers from meeting regularly, the state has planned to create a digitally enabled community of learners which will allow for continuous collaboration and networking. In the current year, the teachers are learning how to access resources through open software. A web portal has been created for all teachers to access the created resources and have links to external resources. The vision of this portal is to enable teachers to blog, discuss and share their ideas, resources they create and their concerns to promote deeper understanding of their subject, as well as enable teachers to participate at a systemic level thus enabling decentralisation. Since this has been provided through free and open software, therefore the only cost involved is the training of teachers and to train them to use the open software and other resources.

The number of days for training under RMSA is mandated for 5 days. But the state needs to explore options for convergence in order to increase the days for training.

Under RMSA, local Tour and Tours out of the state are both supported. The aim is to provide an exposure to students so that they may learn experientially. Places of educational Interest should be explored. But the problem may be that there may not be museums, planetariums in every district. The Headmasters and teachers would have to proactive and plan how even if it is an excursion to a local picnic spot it can be made
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activity oriented. This programme would require connecting to the classroom by making the children reflect on the visit so that learning may happen.
 The Union tourism and culture ministry may also be contacted and the plan for the trip can be done in consonance with the Ministry and its guidelines. The tour should be planned giving details of the trip, place, locale, number of students. The state should call for opinion on the dos and don’ts from experts, local authorities and (issue) specific guidelines to the school/college must be provided. But before the trip one parent’s written consent must be taken. If it is an outstation trip, the school must draw up a detailed itinerary and inform the students and their parents, mentioning the place of stay and other arrangements before the start of the tour if the tour is outstation. The financial norms for local tour is Rs. 200/ per student per year and Rs.2000/- per student per year for tour outside the state.

This has to be explained. Under very special circumstances the amount can be varied as has done for Andaman and Nicobar islands. Rs.4000 per student for outside tour has been approved for Andaman and Nicobar Islands. But the state would have to explain special circumstance and the detailed plan of the programme if any extra cost is proposed for.

• Under RMSA Book Fairs at the district level is supported at Rs.1 lakh per district. The book fair may be organized for two days. The venue of exhibition at each district Head Quarter may be decided by the District Officers of the Department and a detailed schedule for the Book Fair may be drawn up. Publishers may be invited from all over the country by issuing press advertisements. Different publishers need to participate in the book fairs with vast range of their publications on different subjects. A list of Publishers may be created by the District. Terms and Conditions for the publishers need to be set by the state. Publishers would require to get themselves registered with the District Education Office. All the heads of the schools should be directed to place the orders for purchase of library books in association with the school students and committee constituted by Head Office. The Library grant provided under RMSA may be utilized for this purpose.
• Convergence between SSA and RMSA may be explored in the implementation of the Book Fair. If the funds permit, transportation arrangements should be made especially for students from rural area schools to visit the Book Fairs along with their teachers. Parents should also be encouraged to visit the fair with their wards.
• But under RMSA, the book fair is a literary fest which needs to begin in the classroom and be brought back into it. The Language teachers should take the lead in the matter encouraging students to write stories, to read aloud and to create something that may be displayed in the fair. In the fair, young authors may be invited who may read their books for the benefit of the students. This should be particularly encouraged if there are local languages in which books are being written. Also these authors would act as role models for the children. Mostly the Book Fair should not be a onetime activity but a space where children are able to participate and learn. This learning should then be brought back into the classroom in the form of storytelling, discussions and debates on the books that have been bought by the children and the school.

One of the methods to foster science learning is to organize science exhibitions. The purpose of science exhibition is to develop scientific attitude in the students. Also it encourages children to think and to express their creativity. The students would through their models and exhibits provide solutions to the socio-economic problems particularly those problems that are pertinent to their community. Under RMSA, there is a provision of providing Rs.1 lakh per district to organize science exhibitions. These district level exhibitions may be connected to the State Level Science Exhibition funded by NCERT.
Those students who excel in the Science Exhibitions may then be allowed to take advantage of the INSPIRE programme of the Department of Science and Technology. Under the INSPIRE programme, there is a programme called Scheme for Early Attraction of Talents for Science (SEATS) which provides an award of Rs.5000 to one million young learners of the age group of 10-15 years for a duration of 5 years. Of course the aspirants of this programme may also be other students and should not be only restricted to those who take part in the exhibition.
There are other innovative methods of exploring a Science Exhibition. For example, the programme of Study Tour may be coupled with that of a visit to the Mobile Science Exhibition that travels all over India. Science Express (www.science-express.com), a unique science exhibition train traversing across India may be used as a resource to explore what the current debates on science are.

Special Teaching is teaching with two main objectives—identification of learning gaps and development of increased competencies in the child. The aim of Special Training under RMSA is to bridge any gap in learning of Class VIII graduates. This programme is restricted to maximum 20% of the total enrolment. This is not a coaching class and the learning gaps needs to be bridged in the beginning of Class IX. The various steps to be followed while planning for Special Teaching is as under:
• First step is authentic identification of the student. This may be done through school mapping and enrolment drives that schools are involved in.
• Special Teaching need to be provided by an existing teacher in the school where the student would be joining so that the teachers are aware of the problems that the child has and continued support may be provided if required at a later stage
• Special education teachers would require to design and teach appropriate curricula, assign work geared toward each student's needs and abilities
• Special Teaching is to be provided in one to one situation or in small group situation like the tutorial group and it must take into account the individual characteristics of the child
• The special training programmes should be provided within the school premises so that they are integrated into other programmes of the school and it is easier for children to join back
• Special Teaching is not to be targeted at specific communities. However if after an initial identification it is seen that some there are some students who have been identified belonging to specific communities, the specificities of these groups and their realities must be taken into account while planning
• The financial norms are stipulated at Rs. 500/- per child per year.

Under RMSA, there are specific norms that exist on Guidance and Counselling. The following are a summation of the norms under RMSA:
• The existing Bureaus/Units/Wings of Educational and Vocational Guidance, which are about 20 in number, need to be activated both in terms of policy directions and funding. Thus, strengthening the existing Bureaus of Guidance, which are in majority part of SCERTs in terms of establishing accountability channels to root out ambiguities in their functioning, is important.
• Every school should have at least one teacher and preferably two (one male and one female) teacher trained in guidance and counseling. Teacher - Counselors already trained should be utilized for extending training further at state level. In order to meet the growing demand, the curriculum of in-service training programmes of teachers and principals are required to be suitably modified. The Guidance and Counseling should be an essential part of in-service training programme for teachers and principals/ vice principals.
Depending upon the Perspective plan and availability of resources the scheme provides for Guidance and Counseling Grant to the States for strengthening of Guidance Bureaus in States as under,
• Strengthening of Guidance Bureaus/filling up of five posts in 35 States/UTs. 5 persons @ 2.4 lakh per person per year
• Setting up of Guidance Resource Centre (funds for psychological tests/tools, guidance/career literature, display materials etc.) @ Rs,50,000/- per State
• Resource Persons/Research Assistant for development work/field work @ Rs. 1.0 lakh (Salary + TA/DA + Contingency)
• Sensitisation programmes (2 days) for Principals (35-40) by State Bureaus @ Rs.40,000/- per programme per state for 35 States plus contingency

RMSA envisages the existence of Teacher Counselors in the schools. Initially two existing teachers (preferably one male and one female) should be trained to handle both adolescent and career issues of students at the secondary level. Some teachers may be trained in career counseling and some may be trained on handling adolescence issues. A healthy number of teachers should be trained slowly over time so that a good student-counselor ratio may be maintained in the school.

This may be proposed as part of innovation under Quality initially keeping in mind the scalability and impact of the programme. But ultimately every new strategy has to be implemented in the classroom. Hence they have to be an integral part of the teacher training. Therefore once an impact assessment has been done and the programme is deemed successful for implementation in all schools, the teachers have to be trained so that they become the implementers of the programme.

There is no provision for providing funds for tutoring students for Talent Examinations under RMSA. However providing support to students who are appearing for Talent Examinations may be very important. The classroom processes should be strengthened so that the students are prepared for the exams within the classrooms. In fact the timetable of the school should be organized such that such special classes can be accommodated within the school periods.

RMSA supports Laboratory practical in a way that it brings the laboratory to the classroom. There is a provision of providing Mathematics Kits for schools under RMSA. This can be procured either from any agency identified by NCERT or any other institute of repute. But if the Lab Kit is purchased from any other institute, it would have to be vetted by NCERT.

• Under RMSA, the objective is to make culture/heritage education an integral part of the learning process. This has been addressed at different levels: at the school, block and district level. Within the system of the schools, the inputs provided are directed towards both the teachers and the students. The Teachers are specifically targeted because the teachers have an immense impact on the classroom. The different interventions as approved under RMSA in the Annual Work Plan and Budget, 2011-12 that gears towards culture and heritage education is as under:
• Study Tour within and outside the state: The aim of the programme has been to provide the students with an opportunity to understand the historical and the geographical nature of their own state and other states. The aim is also help students understand their own culture in comparison to the culture of the other district as well as the culture of other states.
• Art/Culture Camps in the school, Block and district level: The aim of the Art/Culture camp is to learn art and culture in an enjoyable environment and to provide the students with opportunities to exercise their creativity through performance. The aim of the programme is to encourage critical and analytical thinking, help children with problem-solving, and the challenges they’ll face as adults. By learning their culture through enactment they learn to see the world through a multi-faceted lens.
• Training of Teachers on Heritage and Culture Education: If we accept that the main thrust is on linking education with culture and making students aware of the importance of culture in all development programmes, therefore one of the most important interventions under RMSA is to provide in-service training to teachers on Culture and Heritage Education. The training would provide an understanding and appreciation of the philosophy, aesthetics and beauty inherent in Indian art and culture and focus on formulating methodologies for incorporating a culture component, in curriculum teaching.

• Under RMSA, the objective is to make culture/heritage education an integral part of the learning process. This has been addressed at different levels: at the school, block and district level. Within the system of the schools, the inputs provided are directed towards both the teachers and the students. The Teachers are specifically targeted because the teachers have an immense impact on the classroom. The different interventions as approved under RMSA in the Annual Work Plan and Budget, 2011-12 that gears towards culture and heritage education is as under:
• Study Tour within and outside the state: The aim of the programme has been to provide the students with an opportunity to understand the historical and the geographical nature of their own state and other states. The aim is also help students understand their own culture in comparison to the culture of the other district as well as the culture of other states.
• Art/Culture Camps in the school, Block and district level: The aim of the Art/Culture camp is to learn art and culture in an enjoyable environment and to provide the students with opportunities to exercise their creativity through performance. The aim of the programme is to encourage critical and analytical thinking, help children with problem-solving, and the challenges they’ll face as adults. By learning their culture through enactment they learn to see the world through a multi-faceted lens.
• Training of Teachers on Heritage and Culture Education: If we accept that the main thrust is on linking education with culture and making students aware of the importance of culture in all development programmes, therefore one of the most important interventions under RMSA is to provide in-service training to teachers on Culture and Heritage Education. The training would provide an understanding and appreciation of the philosophy, aesthetics and beauty inherent in Indian art and culture and focus on formulating methodologies for incorporating a culture component, in curriculum teaching.

RMSA encourages decentralized district level planning. Though there is an illustrative list of quality interventions supported under RMSA, but mostly there is a flexibility that is encouraged while planning for quality interventions. States are allowed to innovate different strategies but need to justify all interventions planned in terms of the rationale and the outcome that the intervention plans to achieve.

The review of the curriculum (reviewing the status of the curriculum, review of the syllabus, development of textbooks and teachers’ handbooks) is considered to be the responsibility of the state. Hence the state would have to take it up independently. But curriculum reform would involve reforming not only syllabus and textbooks but also classroom and teaching-learning processes. One of the most important ways of impacting classroom processes is intensive training of teachers to deal with emerging pedagogical and content related concerns. This is where RMSA would be contributing as far as curriculum reform is concerned.

There is no deadline for revision of the curriculum and secondary textbooks but they must be revised as soon as possible so that the syllabus, textbooks and training of teachers is in line with NCF 2005

• Examination Reforms have been considered to be the responsibility of the state. However under RMSA, Question Banks have been supported. A proper procedure needs to be put in place as far as setting up of a Question Bank is concerned.
• A question bank should be established after proper planning. A decision has to be taken about its location (either in the Board of Secondary Education or in the SCERT or in Teacher Education Institutions or in individual institutions or in the University).
• The planners have to be clear about the type of questions to be prepared. The questions may be written or collected from various sources. Questions may be collected from old question papers, books and question bank series published by private publishers. New questions may be invited from experienced teachers, examiners and paper setters.

• The questions should be accompanied by a key and an outline of answer along with the objectives and contents measured by each question.
• After the questions have been written, screening may be done with the help of a group of subject experts.
• All the question should be arranged in a proper order according to their codes topic wise for easy retrieval.
• A question bank may become a store of outdated materials (questions) after some years, if not updated at regular intervals. It must be made up-to-date at least once in three years/five years along with updating of the syllabus and text books.

The RMSA framework mentions the need to reconstruct and redesign the examination system with attributes like flexibility where a student can achieve learning in a flexible time frame and accumulate credits, eliminating tests of fixed duration and adopting continuous and comprehensive evaluation.
The budget to initiate the proposed reforms would include expenditure on the following:
• Workshops by NCERT/SCERT/Boards of Education/ IASEs/CTEs/University Department of Education to familiarize teachers and Board personnel with better modes of administering School Based Assessment (SBA), to make teachers familiar with changing typology of questions, multiple choice questions (MCQ) and testing of order thinking and preparation of such items,
• To train evaluators for judging reflective type answers (multiple answers);
• External moderation of internal grading under school based assessment;
• Technology for machine-marking of MCQs for Boards;
• One time subsidy to Examination Boards to develop statistical and software infrastructure for estimation of relative merit (percentile mark relative to other students of the district/block), in addition to absolute mark
• Preparation of question banks
• Research studies on various aspects of Examinations.
These activities have been highlighted in the framework but the support under RMSA has been provided for preparation of Question Banks. The other activities are considered to be the responsibility of the State.

‘Equity’ is nothing but inclusion of all children into the fold of secondary education irrespective of cast, creed, religion & regions with equal opportunity in all aspects of education.

Not yet developed under RMSA. So far, States/UTs are allowed to develop any intervention as per need under the component. As far as financial norm is concerned, there are no fixed norms yet; interventions are approved based on the following points:
• Interventions followed by an analysis of need at the school/district/state level.
• Interventions for/related to coverage of children into the secondary education are approved based on the number of children/schools per district.
• So far Rs. 500 per child for any kind of need based activity related to children has been approved.
• Specific reports related to drop-out, retention and transition rate have been taken into account for any kind of intervention related to children performance/skill/empowerment programme.
• Achievement level of the children is also being considered for remedial/special training for those who dropped-out after class VIII & IX.
• Special training programme for that children/student who discontinued their study after class VIII or children who are never enrolled after class VIII.
• Equity action plan may be referred for preparation of need based equity interventions.

Till now only 20% of the children are only allowed to avail the activity of remedial teaching. This activity may be taken under either of the two component-Equity or Quality. Apart from the existing 20% provision, if required, state/UT may propose for those who drop-out or never enrolled children outside the regular school with all the necessary details.

Depends upon the category of children, whether the programme only caters for the children in the schools located in the special focus districts/disadvantaged areas having frequent issues like drop-out, irregular of attendance, reluctance in attending classes, migrated etc or for those who repeatedly drop-out of the schooling system due to economic, social, demographic or by any specific reason then that should be included under equity component otherwise in general it should go to quality. Nature of proposal is essentially defined the area.

Yes. Children of any community may be considered for special attention if they are really deprived of schooling facility continuously for several years. Issues related to the subject must be clearly spelt-out in the proposals.

This should be called as programme for improving retention. This may be more or less being focused in those areas having retention problem or high drop-out specially girls.

RMSA at present only allowed training for up-to 25 members of SMDCs per school. It depends upon the number of members consist by a SMDCs in a school. Only 3 days training is allowed under RMSA.

Yes. Since 2010-11 RMSA provides separate budget for the SMDCs training. Earlier it was incurred under MMER. Now it is outside MMER.

Yes. Budget for the same may be taken from MMER. Otherwise state/UT may give separate proposal with all requisite details for a separate budget taking as mandatory for the SMDCs trainers outside MMER. It depends on PAB until revision of framework.

There are no separate criteria fixed for the meeting of SMDCs. This is mandatory to organize/conduct SMDCs meeting every month or otherwise every quarter. School principal is the chairman of each SMDC.

 Inclusive Education for CWSN means education for all including children with special needs (CWSN) / Disabled on equitable basis, i.e. not only providing equal opportunity but creation of conditions for availing such opportunity. Holistic development of a child specific to differently abled child can take place if children not only of the same age and grade actively participate together in all activities but also the children / students of different age and grade also actively participate with the Child with specific needs.

Assessment of identified children is done to ascertain the nature and extent of disability and accordingly provide the appropriate support services and assistive devices to meet the educational needs of the child.

Support services as assistive devices, aids and appliances are essential for the access and retention of CWSN as per need. This would include communication tools, audio visual aids, computer access, universal design for school buildings, Transport &Escort facility, furniture and fixtures, hearing aids, Braille Books, resource room, therapeutical support such as speech therapy, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, books in accessible formats, ICT support, vocational education and training.

For the disabled students studying in secondary stage the concerned organisations are ALIMCO under Ministry of Social Justice & Empowerment, Department of Disability Affairs under ADIP Scheme, States / UTs through their respective programmes / schemes, voluntary organisations and rotary clubs.   The provision also exists in IEDSS scheme of MHRD, Department of School Education & Literacy.  

Resource Room is established at Block level or Cluster level for therapeutic, academic, co-curricular, counseling interventions for implementing the scheme of Inclusive Education for Disabled at Secondary Stage (IEDSS) successfully. The Resource Centre (BRC) at Block level is to be equipped with all equipment’s / materials such as special teaching learning materials, support services as per the need of the CWSN.

Yes, there is a provision of special educators where disabled children are enrolled. Special Educators are appointed in schools for children requiring special teacher support on permanent basis. The same teachers will provide counseling to the parents, help in identifying the needs of children with disabilities and resources therefore, participate in the assessment team, help in training programmes and in other ways whenever necessary. Special educators are teachers who are Graduates or Post Graduates with B.Ed (Special Education) or B.Ed (General) with a two years diploma in Special Education for classes IX&X or XI&XII. Teachers qualified in single disability area will be encouraged to specialize in other disability areas to take care of wide range of diversities in a general school. In case qualified teachers are not available, teachers with short term training courses recognized by Rehabilitation Council of India (RCI) may be appointed with the condition that they will complete the full course within three years of appointment.

The scheme covers all children of age 14+passing out of elementary schools and studying in secondary stage with one or more disabilities as defined under the Persons with Disabilities Act(1995) and the National Trust Act(1999) in the age group 14+to18+ namely Blindness, Low vision, Leprosy cured, Hearing Impairment, Locomotor disabilities, Mental Retardation, Mental Illness, Autism, Cerebral palsy and may eventually cover(1) Speech Impairment and (2) Learning disabilities. Girls with disabilities will receive special focus

Architectural barriers in schools is removed for easy access of the differently abled Students / CWSN. School building made accessible not only by incorporating ramps and railings but accessible classrooms, laboratories, playgrounds, libraries and disabled friendly toilets. Classroom management and teaching & learning methodologies has to be accessible to all without any barrier.

Inter disciplinary team of experts such as Educational psychologists, physiotherapists, speech therapists, occupational therapists, mobility instructor, medical experts as external support to the children with special needs have to be co-ordinated at Block or cluster level to address the needs of children with disabilities.

The scheme has a provision of Environmental building programme that is organizing awareness programmes through awareness camps, Inclusive rally, Inclusive Convention, Inclusive co-curricular activities, posters and Hoardings with positive messages and celebration of World Disabled Day, Louis Braille Day to sensitize peer group, parents, local people and community towards disabilities, their educational needs, rights of CWSN, benefits and provisions of the scheme for the children with disabilities in Secondary Education.

Ans.: Yes, there is a provision of stipend for Girls with disabilities of Rs.200 per month.


Gross Enrollment Ratio: